Oldenbourg Verlag
Die Wissenschaftsverlage der Oldenbourg Gruppe
Akademie Verlag

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466 Kommentare
OK. thanks.
Well, yes. And the early modern world was not all John Aubrey or even Anthony a Wood. But that was the model that seemed reinforced by my network. Of course, the found network was skewed by the metric I chose. But, let's put it another way. Blogs take advantage of a medium that is friendly to images, links, etc., as well as words. We are all in a hurry. What is the chance we re-purpose images again and again from one blog to another (Hitchcock or no?)? After all, my image came from the Folger, via Werner via Hooks. We are watching/using whether we state we "read blogs" or not. Anyway, that is the way I feel tonight.
OK. I am responding to both Nick and Eva it seems. Nick, the point of who comments on whom, whose blog posts related to others (yours on Gavin's, etc.) would be great. But that needs a grant and an assistant I am afraid. I will try the link: thingie, however.
[whoops. This showed up under Nick's comment. Perhaps that is what it does.] Do Burns and Burgess map something besides twitter (should I use twitter metrics to measure blogs?)? Poyntz is indeed correct. But besides my desire to use something I could understand and count quickly (Google Reader vs. WordPress vs. Blogger – it is difficult) and “hits” were not covered across the board either. So I confess that blogrolls was just a cheap metric that I could count the old-fashioned way. But the larger point, that they link and speak to each other, I think, stands regardless of the metric chosen.
Do Burns and Burgess map something besides twitter (should I use twitter metrics to measure blogs?)? Poyntz is indeed correct. But besides my desire to use something I could understand and count quickly (Google Reader vs. WordPress vs. Blogger - it is difficult) and "hits" were not covered across the board either. So I confess that blogrolls was just a cheap metric that I could count the old-fashioned way. But the larger point, that they link and speak to each other, I think, stands regardless of the metric chosen.
I think my emphasis on academia has to be tempered somewhat. (It is of course difficult to track down everyone quickly). But my age might be showing here when I emphasize the significance of bloggers connected in some way to the academy, whereas the expansion of the university makes that a slightly more common credential. It might stem, too, from my own sense that academics SHOULD take it more seriously. I will redo and rethink the proportions.
Yes, will fix that. Got ahead of myself. Thanks.
See also Durer's woodcut Melancholia, which is used in Grafton, Anthony. “Loneliness and Freedom.” Perspectives on History (March 2011): 5-6, to show the lonely work of the historian.
This list (a moving target) is likely to be linked and not included in the print version
Thanks too to Charles Foy.
"Few posts consider broad periodization explicitly." and Keith Livesey (not Livesay)
For most bloggers read most of my sample's bloggers
For English read British, :)
delete especially in its 1958 edition
instead of Wynken de Worde, previously posted by Sarah Werner
This draft is not the latest, because we were having some troubles regarding extra-characters/formatting. It will be revised again before going to print. For now, some minor revisions are noted in my comments below